HHP Summit 2017

Renewable Diesel for Oakland and Oregon

October 6, 2015 in Biofuels, Renewable Diesel by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Fleets Continue to Switch to 100% Drop-In Replacement Product

Fleets including the City of Oakland, Calif. and the Eugene Water & Electric Board in Oregon report switching their diesel vehicles to renewable diesel.

The Eugene Water and Electric Board is among the vehicle operatrors in Oregon now using renewable disel fuel.

The Eugene Water and Electric Board is among the vehicle operatrors in Oregon now using renewable diesel fuel.

Both are using imported NEXBTL-process fuel refined by Neste.

Oakland’s switch took effect with the first of this month, and affects approximately 250 on-road diesel vehicles and 100 off-road vehicles, says fleet director Richard Battersby.

He notes that subsidies and support related to California’d LCFS/low carbon fuels standard offset the higher cost of producing the renewable fuel, while the fuel’s ASTM D-975 rating makes it a 100% drop-in replacement for petroleum diesel.

Golden Gate Petroleum

Battersby notes too that renewable diesel can help reduce emissions from older, dirtier vehicles that are unlikely to be retrofitted with other technologies.

Like neighboring Walnut Creek (F&F, September 11), Oakland gets its renewable diesel from Golden Gate Petroleum of Martinez, Calif.

In Oregon, EWEB is now operating some 55 diesel vehicles on renewable fuel, says fleet manager Gary Lentsch, replacing B30 FAME (fatty acid methyl ester) biodiesel. Counting light duty gasoline vehicles, the total EWEB fleet numbers approximately 225 units.

EWEB gets its R99 renewable diesel from The Jerry Brown Company, also of Eugene. The Neste product is imported by Vitol, Inc.

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Source: Fleets & Fuels interviews and follow-up

Posted in Biofuels, Renewable Diesel.

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