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Clean Energy Fuels for Jacksonville Buses

December 16, 2014 in CNG, Companies, Fleet Order, LNG, NGVs by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

$8.1 Million for a New CNG Station for Projected Million DGEs Annually,
Clean Energy Says It Fueled 5,510 More NGVs This Year for a 23% Gain,
Kansas City Opened Public Access CNG Station Supporting 265 City NGVs

Clean Energy Fuels today disclosed an $8.1 million deal with JTA, Florida’s Jacksonville Transportation Authority, for a compressed natural gas fueling installation to support a new fleet of 100 CNG buses, eventually to number 100, as well as other customers. Construction is to be completed in late 2015. updated with Kansas City photo on December 17

JTA expects to begin receiving CNG buses from Gillig late in 2015: 20 per year for a total of 100.

JTA expects to begin receiving CNG buses from Gillig late in 2015: 20 per year for a total of 100.

And, as part of a broad-reaching year-end wrap-up, Clean Energy said that 5,510 additional natural gas vehicles began fueling via its nationwide network year-to-date (through December 5), “a 23% increase in vehicles fueling compared to the same period in 2013.”

“We’re ordering 20 at a time, for 100 over a five-year period,” says JTA transit operations VP Lisa Darnall. They will be BRT-style buses from Gillig, she told F&F, noting that in addition to designing and building and maintaining the new CNG station, Clean Energy will handle ongoing fuel supply as part of a public-private partnership, or P3. The station will include across-the-fence public fueling too, she says.

Substantial Savings for JTA

Once fully deployed, the JTA fleet is expected to consume approximately 1 million diesel gallon equivalents of CNG annually. “JTA anticipates saving approximately $5.7 million over the life of the agreement by switching to natural gas fuel,” Clean Energy says.

Clean Energy says that in addition, its facility modification team has been tapped to retrofit JTA’s two maintenance facilities to accommodate the new CNG fleet.

It’s a 15-year agreement “that will provide land rent and royalty revenue to the JTA for any CNG DGE sold or provided to any entity other than the JTA,” states an agency staff report. “Because the CNG program is being procured as a P3, there is a minimal capital outlay to fund the infrastructure,” the report states. “JTA will effectively pay for the remaining capital costs through the cost charged by Clean Energy for CNG fuel over 15 years…

“Staff estimates operational savings of $225,000 from lower fuel costs the first year and recurring savings of $1.25 million in year five and beyond.”

LNG-fueled tractors for hauling LNG from Clean Energy's production facility in Boron, Calif.

LNG-fueled tractors for hauling LNG from Clean Energy’s production facility in Boron, Calif.

Kenan to USE LNG to Haul LNG

Clean Energy also said today that KAG, the Kenan Advantage Group, has commenced hauling LNG from Clean Energy’s Boron, Calif., plant using 13 LNG-fueled trucks.

In other highlights from Clean Energy’s big Tuesday release:

  • MBTA, the Palms Springs area’s Morongo Basin Transit Authority, which fuels 28 CNG vehicles at two private fueling stations, has renewed Clean Energy’s facility maintenance contract;
  • UPS continues deployment of North America’s largest fleet of liquefied natural gas trucks, and Clean Energy opened its Houston Flying J LNG station to fuel ten tractors expected to consume approximately 240,000 DGEs of LNG per year; and
  • Des Moines-based third-party logistics company Norbert Dentressangle is to deploy its first seven CNG tractors which will haul and fuel throughout Clean Energy’s public station network in Illinois.
LNG-fueled Volvo tractors for Giant/Martin’s at Clean Energy station in Carlisle, Pa.

LNG-fueled Volvo tractors for Giant/Martin’s at Clean Energy station in Carlisle, Pa.

Clean Energy reported the following new “truck-friendly” public-access stations with anchor tenants:

  • Albany, Ga., for Raven Transport;
  • Charlotte, N.C., for G & P Trucking;
  • Carlisle, Pa., for Giant/Martin’s;
  • West Sacramento, Calif., for Chavez Trucking; and
  • Midland, Texas, opened for Dillon Transport.

Several fleets have begun testing natural gas from Clean Energy:

  • Water Recovery of Jacksonville, Fla., began fueling heavy-duty LNG trucks at Clean Energy’s Jacksonville public station;
  • NorCal Beverage of West Sacramento, Calif., began fueling heavy-duty LNG trucks at Clean Energy’s West Sacramento public station;
  • Vend Catering Supply of La Mirada, Calif., expanded its natural gas fleet with additional heavy-duty CNG trucks fueling at Clean Energy’s public station network in California; and
  • Sheehy Mail Contractors, Inc., of Waterloo, Wisc., moved to expand its heavy natural gas truck fleet by adding four CNG tractors, which will fuel at Clean Energy’s public station network in New Mexico and Arizona.

Clean Energy says that by year-end, it will have expanded the network of stations that it owns, operates or supplies to more than 535 in 42 states. The firm “will have constructed more CNG fast-fill, CNG time-fill, LNG and CNG/LNG stations than any other company in the country. These include 69 stations that were built and completed during the year, including 18 projects where additional compression capacity was added due to increased demand.

Substantial Demand in Kansas City

A net increase of 74 stations were opened during the year, 25 of which can accommodate heavy-duty trucks.

Clean Energy's CNG station for Kansas City, the municipality’s fifth but the first for public access, opened this week.

Clean Energy’s CNG station for Kansas City, the municipality’s fifth but the first for public access, opened this week.

Just yesterday, Clean Energy says, Kansas City opened its first public-access CNG station, helping support a municipal fleet of more than 265 light-, medium-, and heavy-duty NGVs “with the expectation that this NGV fleet will grow to more than 400.

“As previously-announced, this fleet is forecasted to consume approximately 1 million GGEs of CNG annually.”

The $2.1 million outlet is Kansas City’s fifth municipal CNG station overall. It has two dispensers with two hoses each that are dedicated for City vehicle use, and one pump with two hoses for public use.


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Source: Clean Energy Fuels with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

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