ACT News 2017


BioCNG for Persigo and Colorado NGVs

January 2, 2015 in Biofuels, Biomethane, CNG, Infrastructure, NGVs by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Ground Broken for Wastewater-Based Unit in Grand Junction

BioCNG and partners broke ground last month on a project to process wastewater-derived biogas into biomethane, to be sent via dedicated pipeline some six miles to fuel city fleet vehicles at an existing compressed natural gas outlet in Grand Junction, Colo. updated January 5 & 6

CNG fueling of Grand Valley Transit buses in Colorado will be supported by wastewater-derived fuel, processed by Cornerstone/BioCNG.

CNG fueling of Grand Valley Transit buses in Colorado will be supported by wastewater-derived fuel, processed by Cornerstone/BioCNG.

The BioCNG purification installation is at the Persigo wastewater treatment plant jointly owned by the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County (F&F, July 25, 2014). The feed gas is approximately 60% methane.

BioCNG engineered the system and took care of the necessary permits, and will be providing construction management, commissioning, and system start up. Mike Melan is BioCNG project manager.

A ceremony for the $2.8 million Cornerstone/BioCNG biogas-to-biomethane project at the Persigo wastewater treatment plant was attended by Grand Junction Mayor Phyllis Norris and Mesa County Commissioner Steve Acquafresca, along with Leslie Hentze, representing the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, which contributed more than $500,000 for the work.

A ceremony for the $2.8 million Cornerstone/BioCNG biogas-to-biomethane project at the Persigo wastewater treatment plant was attended by Grand Junction Mayor Phyllis Norris and Mesa County Commissioner Steve Acquafresca, along with Leslie Hentze, representing the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, which contributed more than $500,000 for the work.

‘100% of Our Needs’

The resulting biomethane will support more than 30 vehicles, including City refuse trucks, dump trucks, pick-ups and sedans, and buses owned by GVT – Grand Valley Transit.

“The project, the first its kind in Colorado, continues the City’s movement toward a CNG-fueled fleet,” BioCNG says. “The savings in CNG fuel versus diesel fuel are expected to pay off immediately and the cost of the entire project should be paid off in a decade.”

The BioCNG has a nominal daily capacity of 450 to 500 equivalent gallons per day. “”We hope to get 350 gallons a day,” says Grand Junction fleet manager Tim Barker.

“Currently that is 100% of our needs,” he told F&F.

The city operates 28 natural gas vehicles now and expects to add ten this year, says city utility engineer Bret Guillory. GVT has four CNG buses ands expects to add five, he says.

The City of Grand Junction expects to have more than three dozen CNG-fueled vehicles by year-end. photos courts Bret Guillory

The City of Grand Junction expects to have more than three dozen CNG-fueled vehicles by year-end. photos courtesy Bret Guillory

Eliminates Flaring

“The Persigo BioCNG Project can serve as a model for other communities as part of a strategy to address air quality, climate change, energy efficiency, and energy security and independence,” Mayor Norris says in BioCNG’s announcement.

“According to the City of Grand Junction,” sates the release, “the project also eliminates burning off methane biogas that is the equivalent of about 146,000 gallons of gasoline a year, and prevents the annual release into the atmosphere of nearly 3 million pounds of carbon dioxide.”

BioCNG’s Persigo installation is expected to be completed by April.


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Source: BioCNG with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

Posted in Biofuels, Biomethane, CNG, Infrastructure, NGVs and tagged , , , , .

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