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Cenergy Claims an ANG Breakthrough

April 15, 2015 in CNG, NGVs, Technology by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Says Technology Can Be Applied to Existing CNG Cylinders

Fremont, Calif.-based Cenergy Solutions is promoting technology for ANG – adsorbent natural gas – allowing natural gas vehicle fuel to be stored onboard at far lower pressures than those necessary today, with more storage in the same size cylinder.

ANG-modified cylinders on Cenergy Solutions’ California-approved test vehicle receiving their first CNG fill (September 2014)

ANG-modified cylinders on Cenergy Solutions’ California-approved test vehicle receiving their first CNG fill (September 2014)


Cenergy’s ANG technology can be applied to existing compressed natural gas cylinders, the company says.

The firm says it’s filed for U.S. and international patents on its “breakthrough” ANG gear.

“With lower pressure requirements, compressors for homes or businesses will cost less to purchase, operate and maintain,” Cenergy says. NGVs using ANG have the potential for greater singe-fill ranges than today’s NGVs with CNG tanks.

‘Game-Changer’

“Adsorbent natural gas technology has been talked about for years,” Cenergy COO Gary Fanger said in a release. Cenergy, he said, has overcome previous ANG challenges.

“It is a game changer in the NGV industry,” he told F&F.

Cenergy says it’s tested its ANG technology on a vehicle with an 8.1-liter GM engine for more than 10,000 miles with heavy payloads, at high altitude and I cold weather.

Cenergy says that its patent-pending ANG system controls the adsorption and release of natural gas inside the cylinder, optimizing the amount of methane that can be held in the cylinder ‘to the point it is almost in a liquefied state at its peak adsorption.’ The Cenergy technology also controls the release of the methane as needed to fuel the engine, and ‘can be used in many of the cylinders now in operation.’

Cenergy says that its patent-pending ANG system controls the adsorption and release of natural gas inside the cylinder, optimizing the amount of methane that can be held in the cylinder ‘to the point it is almost in a liquefied state at its peak adsorption.’ The Cenergy technology also controls the release of the methane as needed to fuel the engine, and ‘can be used in many of the cylinders now in operation.’

“The results have been very positive, and we look forward to testing the system in two distinct and separate commercial fleets,” Fanger said.

“We have been testing with Type III cylinders but we have no reason to believe that it won’t work on all types of cylinders,” he says.

EnerG2 and NW Natural

Cenergy credits its technological collaboration with EnerG2, a Seattle-based specialist in nano-engineered, polymer-based carbon materials for high-performance energy storage.

“We’re trying to eliminate the gasoline-driven vehicle, and our partnership and collaboration with Cenergy Solutions is certainly pushing us down that path,” EnerG2 CTO Aaron Feaver says in the Cenergy ANG release.

“This is a significant breakthrough that will have lasting impact on several different fronts,” Feaver said.

‘Waiting Three Decades’

Cenergy is also working with Portland, Ore.-based NW Natural, a local natural gas distribution company.

“We have been waiting three decades for ANG to become a reality and are grateful to be part of the research and development efforts of Cenergy Solutions and EnerG2,” said NW Natural engineer and business developer Chris Galati.

“The price advantage and environmental benefits of natural gas as a transportation fuel are widely known and adsorbed natural gas simply makes the physical storage and performance of the fuel delivery work better on board the vehicle,” Galati said in the Cenergy announcement.

EnerG2 and NW Natural announced their collaboration on ANG one year ago (F&F, April 21, 2014).


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Source: Cenergy Solutions with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

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