ACT Expo 2018


CD-adapco Eases Battery Pack Design

July 29, 2014 in Electric Drive, EVs, Technology by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Advanced Lithium-Ion Battery Simulation Tools Available

Detroit-based CD-adapco is promoting methodology making it easier to design lithium ion battery packs, thereby “enabling faster design and development of advanced electric drive vehicle power systems.”

CD-adapco graph shows predicted cell temperature during an automotive drive cycle, with temperature on the surface of a cell within a simulated module plotted against an experimental measurement. Image at right shows the position of the temperature sensors in the tested module.

CD-adapco graph shows predicted cell temperature during an automotive drive cycle, with temperature on the surface of a cell within a simulated module plotted against an experimental measurement. Image at right shows the position of the temperature sensors in the tested module.

The technology has been incorporated in CD-adapco’s flagship STAR-CCM+ and in its application specific Battery Design Studio tool.

“These solutions provide seamless integration between electrochemists and thermal engineers within the battery design process,” the company says, by “linking the flow, thermal and electrochemical simulations into one environment.”

The CD-adapco work was supported by the U.S. DoE through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory – specifically CAEBAT, the Computer-Aided Engineering of Electric Drive Batteries initiative launched by DoE in 2010, CD-adapco says. The project team included CD-adapco, Battery Design Inc., Johnson Controls and A123.

Physics-Based Models, Linked

“Developing and linking physics-based models of batteries allows developers and designers to better understand the internal behavior of batteries in electric drive vehicles and explore new designs in a virtual environment,” NREL energy storage group manager Ahmad Pesaran says in a CD-adapco release, “reducing the number of prototypes and tests required by a traditional build-break design cycle.

“The outcome of this project is expected to enable scientists and engineers to further improve the performance, cost, and lifetime of advanced lithium ion batteries,” Pesaran said.

“These technologies have helped us design innovative battery systems and enable new fuel-saving technologies for vehicles,” said Brian Sisk, director of controls and modeling at Johnson Controls.

Steve Hartridge is director of electric and hybrid vehicles at CD-adapco.


-------------------------------
Contact information is only available to premium subscribers. Click here to purchase a subscription.

Source: CD-adapco with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

Posted in Electric Drive, EVs, Technology and tagged , , , , , , .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


  • Archives