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SAE Issues Report on Wireless Charging

July 19, 2016 in EVs, EVSE, milestones, WEVC by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Expects Standard on Wireless EV Charging Next Year
As TIR J2954 Said to Be ‘A Milestone Industry Guideline’

SAE International’s wireless electric vehicle charging task force is making increasingly rapid progress toward a standard for equipment to allow electric vehicles to charge inductively, with no need for plugs and cables. The WEVC standard, for which a TIR/technical information report has just been issued, carries SAE’s J2954 designation.

The WEVC basics: electric vehicles will charge with no need to plug them in. image courtesy WiTricity

The WEVC basics: electric vehicles will charge with no need to plug them in. image courtesy WiTricity



Wireless EV charging is seen as an enabler for the nascent electric vehicle market, as it will allow EVs equipped with WEVC receptors to charge by parking them in spaces correspondingly equipped with WEVC power transmitters.

WEVC technology developers have teamed with Tier One OEM suppliers to bring commercial products to market, as SAE works to ensure interoperability between the various offerings.

WiTricity-Toyota-600

Toyota testing of WiTricity’s WEVC started in February 2014, WiTricity says.

Commercial in 2017?

Commercial availability, probably on higher-end EVs first, could be as soon as next year (F&F, August 11, 2015).

SAE’s TIR J2954 Wireless Power Transfer for Light-Duty Plug-In/Electric Vehicles and Alignment Methodology document is “a milestone industry guideline,” the organization says, “to establish wireless power transfer between infrastructure, vehicle suppliers and OEMs for plug-in electric and electric vehicles.”

‘The First Step in Standardization’

SAE notes that WPT/wireless power transfer is “quickly becoming mainstream for consumer electronic devices in low power applications,” and that a governing standard is needed as the technology is applied to high-power products like electric cars. “TIR J2954 is the first step in standardization,” SAE says.

WiTricity's WiT-3300 WEVC system 'provides a complete set of wireless energy source and capture modules.' the company says, 'that can be integrated into an EV or HEV for a truly wireless park-and-charge system.' It is, WiTricity says. 'a no compromise system' designed to charge at the same 3.3-kilowatt rate as many wired chargers.

WiTricity’s WiT-3300 WEVC system ‘provides a complete set of wireless energy source and capture modules.’ the company says, ‘that can be integrated into an EV or HEV for a truly wireless park-and-charge system.’ It is, WiTricity says. ‘a no compromise system’ designed to charge at the same 3.3-kilowatt rate as many wired chargers.

“Wireless power transfer, using SAE TIR J2954 is a game changer,” SAE’s WPT committee chairman Jesse Schneider said in a release.

‘Seamlessly Transfer Power Over an Air Gap’

“This first in a series of documents will enable consumers to simply park their vehicles into spaces equipped with TIR J2954 equipment and walk away without doing anything to charge their PH/EV,” he said. (Schneider is also fuel cell, electric vehicle and standards development manager at BMW.)

“Standardization of both the vehicle and ground infrastructure WPT has started with SAE TIR J2954,” Schneider said. “The frequency band, safety, interoperability, EMC/EMF limits as well as coil definitions from SAE TIR J2954 enable any compatible vehicle to charge wirelessly from its WPT home charger, work, or a shopping mall WPT charger, etc. with the same charging ability.

More and More Power

“All of this makes it possible to seamlessly transfer power over an air gap with high efficiencies,” Schneider said. “SAE TIR J2954 WPT automates the process for charging and extends the range for the vehicle customer only by parking in the right spot.”

Qualcomm has sponsored an inductively charged battery electric BMW i8 pace car for the international Formula E circuit.

Qualcomm has sponsored an inductively charged battery electric BMW i8 pace car for the international FIA Formula E battery-electric race car circuit.

The TIR J2954 document sets WPT 1 and WPT 2 specs for 3.7- and 7.7-kilowatt charging, respectively. It “is planned to be standardized after the 2016 timeframe after receiving field data,” SAE says.

WPT 3 and WPT 4 for 11- and 22-kilowatt wireless charging remain in development.

SAE J2954 Webex Meeting on August 1

“Future revisions may include even higher power levels,” SAE says.

SAE will host a Webex meeting on the evolving standard, covering the entire range J2954 issues, on August 1 at noon Eastern time, 9:00am Pacific.

  • Virginia-based Evatran just last week publicized a joint venture with a Chinese company to commercialize its “Plugless” WEVC products there (F&F, July 15).
  • Qualcomm, which actively promotes WEVC under the Halo tradename, has pacts with Ricardo and Efacec to commercialize the technology (F&F, November 30, 2015 and April 4, 2016).
  • Massachusetts-based WiTricity earlier announced an agreement with Japan’s TDK to allow TDK to commercialize WiTricity’s resonant wireless power transfer technology for EV charging (F&F, April 29, 2014).

The SAE TIR J2954 document may be purchased for $74.


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Source: SAE International with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

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