ACT Expo 2017


Proterra Extends Range to 350 Miles

September 12, 2016 in batteries, Electric Drive, EVs, New Products, transit by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

‘Nominal’ Figure for New Catalyst E2 Battery Bus Series,
Vehicle Topped 600 Miles at the Laurens Proving Grounds

Proterra has launched a new all-battery transit bus variant, trumpeting a “nominal” single-charge range of up to 350 miles for the Catalyst E2 with 440 to 660 kilowatt hours of battery capacity. updated September 14

With the Catalyst E2, Proterra claims to offer to the transit industry ‘the first direct replacement for fossil-fueled transit vehicles.’

With the Catalyst E2, Proterra claims to offer to the transit industry ‘the first direct replacement for fossil-fueled transit vehicles.’



E2 stands for vehicle’s “unprecedented” efficient energy, the company says.

An E2 series vehicle logged more than 600 miles last month on a single charge under test conditions at the Michelin Laurens Proving Grounds in South Carolina, Proterra adds.

The new vehicle’s “nominal range of 194 to 350 miles means the Catalyst E2 series is capable of serving the full daily mileage needs of nearly every U.S. mass transit route on a single charge and offers the transit industry the first direct replacement for fossil-fueled transit vehicles,” states this morning release.

‘Under $800K’

The cost of a Catalyst E2 bus is “under $800K,” says Proterra spokesman Steven Brewster, with final price, he told F&F, dependent on “customer preferences and customization.”

Proterra imafe shows technicians at work at the company's battery facility in Silicon Valley.

Proterra imafe shows technicians at work at the company’s battery facility in Silicon Valley.

Proterra claims a state-of-the-art battery engineering lab in Silicon Valley. “To gain efficiencies, we have re-engineered the complete battery system and are now building both modules and battery packs,” Brewster says. “The Proterra Catalyst E2 is powered by the world’s first lithium-ion battery packs specifically designed for the transit industry,” he adds. “We are working to lead the way in battery technology in the transit industry.”

Proterra battery suppliers have included Toshiba and LG Chem (F&F, June 10, 2015). Today, “We work with a variety of the best global suppliers and produce a module that’s designed for safety and durability in heavy-duty applications,” Brewster says. Colorado’s UQM Technologies supplies driveline componentry.

Proterra CEO Ryan Popple

Proterra CEO Ryan Popple

‘Breakthrough Year’

Proterra said further that it’s experiencing a “breakthrough year,” with sales already 220% higher than 2015.

Doubling Production

The firm pledges to double production in 2017 with manufacturing lines in full operation in Greenville, S.C. and the City of Industry, Calif. To date, the company says, “Proterra buses across the United States have completed over 2.5 million miles of revenue service, displacing 540,000 gallons of diesel, and eliminating nearly 10 million pounds of carbon emissions.”

“Proterra’s primary goal has always been to create a purpose-built, high-performance electric vehicle that can serve every single transit route in the United States,” CEO Ryan Popple says in the E2 announcement.

“Who Will Be the Last?’

“Today, with the unveiling of the Catalyst E2 Series, that goal has been achieved,” Popple said. “The question is no longer who will be an early adopter of this technology, but rather who will be the last to commit to a future of clean, efficient, and sustainable mobility.

“With the Catalyst E2 offering a no-compromise replacement for all fossil fuel buses, battery-electric vehicles have now broken down the final barrier to widespread market adoption.”


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Source: Proterra with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

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