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US Hybrid Fuel Cell Trucks for Houston

July 21, 2015 in Electric Drive, fuel cells, Hydrogen, Technology by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Multiple Partners to Demonstrate Zero-Emission Port Drayage

The Houston-Galveston Area Council is leading a multi-partner, $7.6 million program with the Gas Technology Institute to deploy and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell drayage trucks for the Port of Houston.

The joint project is to see three Class 8 Navistar International ProStar tractors fitted with US Hybrid fuel cells driving 320-kilowatt (430 horsepower) electric motors. "The prototype trucks will have a range of 200 miles, with a top speed of 60 mph,' says the Environmental Defense Fund.

The joint project is to see three Class 8 Navistar International ProStar tractors fitted with US Hybrid fuel cells driving 320-kilowatt (430 horsepower) electric motors. “The prototype trucks will have a range of 200 miles, with a top speed of 60 mph,’ says the Environmental Defense Fund.


US Hybrid is converting three 80,000-pound GVWR Navistar International ProStar day cab tractors to hydrogen operation using 320-kilowatt/430-horsepower fuel cells and 32-kilowatt-hour battery assemblies.

EERE, the U.S. Energy Department’s office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, is providing $3.4 million, with project partners committing more than $3 million to the three-year effort, says the Environmental Defense Fund, which helped secure the federal funding and is continuing in an outreach and documentation role.

H-GAC estimates total project outlays at upwards of $7.6 million.

Richardson Trucking

The fuel cell tractors will be operated by Richardson Trucking, EDF says, “in the rugged, real-world applications of drayage, where a job may occur on unpaved and paved roads, on steep grades, such as the Sidney Sherman bridge that crosses the Houston Ship Channel, in areas with limited maneuverability, such as port terminals and railyards, and in and out of traffic.”

Existing hydrogen fueling station owned and operated by the Gas Technology Institute at the University of Texas J.J. Pickle Research Center in Austin. The station serves the CapMetro transit agency. Capacity is approximately 100 kilograms of hydrogen per day vis steam reformation of natural gas. Hydrogen fuel is delivered via a proprietary GTI HydroFill dispenser.

Existing hydrogen fueling station owned and operated by the Gas Technology Institute at the University of Texas J.J. Pickle Research Center in Austin. The station serves the CapMetro transit agency. Capacity is approximately 100 kilograms of hydrogen per day vis steam reformation of natural gas. Hydrogen fuel is delivered via a proprietary GTI HydroFill dispenser.

The US Hybrid trucks will have a range of 200 miles and a top speed of 60 mph.

GTI will install a hydrogen fueling station at a new Richardson facility in Baytown, says Brian Weeks, GTI’s area director for Houston. The installation will include a Hydrogenics electrolyzer and a natural gas steam reformer. “We’ll be buying renewable energy off the grid,” he told F&F. It will be GTI’s seventh hydrogen fueling station.

‘Clean Technologies Can Transform Goods Movement’

Project data will be collected and analyzed by the University of Texas Center for Electromechanics.

“Our collective goal,” states an EDF blog post, “is to show that clean technologies can transform goods movement, improving the quality of the air we all breathe without compromising freight efficiency at the Port of Houston.”


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Source: EDF with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

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