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More Wärtsilä RNG for Nordic Buses

March 21, 2016 in Biomethane, Companies, Infrastructure, LNG, transit by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

Biokraft Facility Near Trondheim Based on Fishery & Paper Mill Waste
Iintended to Be Region’s ‘Largest Biogas Plant to Provide Fuel for Buses’

Finland’s Wärtsilä, a giant in the world of natural gas as a marine fuel, says it is supplying the “Nordic countries’ largest biogas plant to provide fuel for buses.” Wärtsilä claims a novel natural gas liquefaction technology based on readily available, well proven components, “specially designed to liquefy small methane-based gas streams.” updated March 23 & 24

The Wärtsilä installation at the paper mill in Skogn, Norway is to convert cleaned biogas from fishery waste and residual paper mill slurry into liquefied natural gas fuel.

The Wärtsilä installation at the paper mill in Skogn, Norway is to convert cleaned biogas from fishery waste and residual paper mill slurry into liquefied natural gas fuel.


The installation by Biokraft Norway is at the Norske Skog Skogn paper mill near Trondheim. Biogas from the mill and fishery operations is to be upgraded to biomethane feedstock for the Wärtsilä unit by Purac Puregas.

“We expect strong demand in a fast growing market for liquefied biogas fuel,” Biokraft CEO Håvard Wollan says in Wärtsilä’s announcement. Product is to be sold by AGA Linde for Norway buses and ferries, says Marianne Langvik, assistant to Wollan. “This is all subject to tenders for long contracts,” she told F&F.

The Norske Skog Skogn paper mill near Trondheim, Norway

The Norske Skog Skogn paper mill near Trondheim, Norway

“Wärtsilä’s biogas liquefaction solution represents an important step forward in realizing this potential,” Wollan said. “The fuel can now be produced economically and sustainably, which were key factors in the award of this contract.”

Chemical Adsorption for Biogas Purification

Wärtsilä says it signed the gas supply contract with Puregas this past December. Puregas uses a chemical adsorption process dubbed CApure to convert raw biogas into biomethane. “The selective organic solvents used in this process are so efficient that the end product can contain more than 99% methane and is suitable for vehicle fuel or to be injected into the natural gas grid,” the company says.

The Wärtsilä-Puregas equipment at the Skogn paper mill “will convert the cleaned biogas from fishery waste and residual paper mill slurry into liquid fuel,” Wärtsilä says – renewable liquefied natural gas.

‘Minimal Environmental Footprint’

The bioLNG, often referred to as LBG, for liquid or liquefied biogas, is transportable by tanker truck. It will be handled as a commodity for customers including transit bus operators, notes Arne Jakobsen of Wartsila.

Purac Puregas claims a process dubbed ‘CApure’ which it says recovers more than 99.9% of the biomethane present in raw biogas.

Sweden-based Purac Puregas claims a process dubbed ‘CApure’ which it says recovers more than 99.9% of the biomethane in raw biogas. The firm has a new U.S. subsidiary dubbed Puregas Solutions.

“The system offers low operating costs and is energy efficient,” Wärtsilä VP Timo Koponen said in a release. “Furthermore, the environmental footprint will be minimal. By enabling profitable projects for smaller gas streams, we are aiding the EU’s target of having 10% renewable fuel by the year 2020.”

Approximately 16,000 Gallons Per Day

“The plant at Skogn will be privately operated and, with a capacity of 25 tons of liquid biogas per day, will be the biggest in the Nordic countries,” said Øystein Ihler, climate and energy development director for the City of Oslo. “It is a game-changer in the biogas fuel market,” he said.

Natural gas fueled buses in Trondheim .. Thor Neilsen photo courtesy Biokraft

Natural gas fueled buses in Trondheim .. Thor Neilsen photo courtesy Biokraft

Initial capacity will be approximately 12.5 tons of bioLNG per day, or about 8,000 gallons, says Biokraft, noting that the facility is being built with plans to double it in size next year.

Oslo Expects Thousands of NGVs, Plus Natural Gas Ferries

Oslo currency has 200 buses and 100 waste collection trucks running on bio-based CNG and expects by 2020 to have 1,200 buses on the renewable fuel, as well as some 2,000 taxis and the ferries operating in the local fjord.

Trondheim, notes Biokraft’s Langvik, has approximately 230 buses and two ferries operating on LNG. Fuel is current imported from Sweden, she says.

Nordic Trains Too?

In addition to buses and ferries, “We even see possibilities for railways, as it will be cheaper to convert  to gas than to electrify the lines.”

She notes too that the Skogn facility “is situated by the main road through Norway, has access to harbor facilities, and even has a small railway track on the vicinity… [all] making Skogn an ideal location logistically.”

Wärtsilä says it is “delivering the system on a fast-track basis and the on-site installation is scheduled to be completed within a 15-month timeframe.”

Wärtsilä detailed its role in a liquefaction plant to support LNG buses in Oslo in early 2014 (F&F, February 18, 2014).

Wärtsilä detailed its role in a previous liquefaction plant to support natural gas buses in Oslo in early 2014 (F&F, February 18, 2014).


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Source: Wärtsilä with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

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