ACT Expo 2018


The ISL G NZ – ‘Near Zero’ from CWI

October 6, 2015 in New Products, NGVs, Technology by Rich Piellisch  |  No Comments

‘Game-Changing Reduction in Urban Tailpipe and Engine-Related Emissions’
Engine with GHG and Ozone-NOx Benefits ‘Could Not Have Been More Timely,’
Company Asks That Credit Be Given Under New Federal Emissions Regulations

Cummins Westport, Inc. has begun marketing its Near Zero ISL G dedicated-natural gas engine as the ISL G NZ, having secured certification of nitrogen oxide emissions at just 0.02 grams per brake-horsepower – 90% below 2010 U.S. EPA requirements.

Cummins Westport ISL G and, at right, methane emissions-slashing closed crankcase vacuum unit on display at the 2015 North American Natural Gas Vehicle Conference & Expo in Denver, where word spread about California certification of 0.02 NOx for the ISL G (F&F, September 17). Now the U.S. EPA certificate for the ISL G Near Zero is in hand as well.

Cummins Westport ISL G and, at right, methane emissions-slashing closed crankcase vacuum unit on display at the 2015 North American Natural Gas Vehicle Conference & Expo in Denver, where word spread about California certification of 0.02 NOx for the ISL G (F&F, September 17). Now the U.S. EPA certificate for the ISL G Near Zero is in hand as well.


Separately, CWI has asked federal regulators to include credit for the low emissions in the pending new EPA-NHTSA regulation governing greenhouse gas emissions for medium and heavy duty vehicles. CWI parent Westport filed comments jointly with Clean Energy Fuels and AGA, the American Gas Association.

Word of California Air Resources Board certification of the optional Near Zero NOx levels for the 8.9-liter ISL G circulated at last month’s NGVAmerica meeting in Denver (F&F, September 17). CWI now has the official EPA certificate as well.

Reliability and Operating Improvements Too

“These North America emission certifications result in a game-changing reduction in urban tailpipe and engine related emissions,” CWI president Rob Neitzke said in a release yesterday. “This, combined with the reliability and operating improvements on the base ISL G engine,” he said, “puts CWI natural gas engines at the forefront of cost-effective and dependable emission reduction strategies in transit, medium-duty truck and refuse applications.”

The Cummins Westport ISL G has become the default engine in North America for transit buses opearting on CNG...

The Cummins Westport ISL G has become the default engine in North America for transit buses opearting on CNG…

Neitzke told F&F that CWI has been field testing the engine with transit launch customers Gillig, New Flyer and NovaBus and with refuse vehicle providers Autocar, Mack and Peterbilt.

The ISL G NZ will be an option along with the standard ISL G: “Our current product plans is to offer both,” he says, at least through 2017.

CWI notes that in addition to NOx emissions 90% lower than the current EPA limit, the engine will meet 2017 EPA greenhouse gas emission requirements. CWI’s natural gas engines have met the 2010 EPA standard for particulate matter (0.01 g/bhp-hr) since 2001.

Closing the Gap with Electric Vehicles

“Since it was first introduced in 2007, the ISL G 8.9 liter engine has become the leading natural gas engine for transit buses, refuse trucks and urban delivery trucks, which represent a significant portion of on-highway and urban power in California,” the company says.

More 40,000 natural gas powered trucks and buses operate in North America, CWI says – “and the new ISL G NZ will power Near Zero emission trucks and buses at a significant discount to the cost of electric powered vehicles.” CWI notes that CARB has defined the certified Near Zero emission level as equivalent to a 100% battery truck using electricity from a modern combined cycle natural gas power plant.

“It helps us close the gap on anything electric,” Neitzke says.

70% Lower Methane Emissions, Good for Ozone Too

In addition to the 90% reduction in NOx, the ISL G NZ will feature CCV/closed crankcase ventilation, reducing engine-related methane emissions by 70%.

...and for CNG refuse trucks.

…and for CNG refuse trucks.

CWI, filing with AGA and Clean Energy, has asked the U.S. EPA and NHTSA to maintain provisions for advanced technology credits as it finalizes its new regulation for trucks and buses. An expanded ATC, the company said in their regulatory comments, “will help spur the commercial development of engines that will be necessary to help states meet their obligations under any future ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS)” and “will lay the groundwork for the next generation of heavy-duty engine technology.”

‘The Only Way’

“Air quality attainment plans up and down California all speak to the need to reduce NOx emissions from heavy-duty trucks by 90% from U.S. EPA 2010 emissions levels in order to meet federal ozone attainment standards,” says Erik Neandross, CEO at GNA – Gladstein, Neandross & Associates.

“It’s the only way to get from here to there,” Neandross told F&F. “With the release of the new 70 ppb ozone standard by EPA last week, the importance of such strategies is now magnified on a national basis. States like Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas and others now have even further needs to reduce NOx emissions and thus ozone levels in the atmosphere.

The Cummins Westport ISL G

The Cummins Westport ISL G

Ramp Up!

“The development and availability of this game-changing ultra-low NOx natural gas engine technology could not have been any more timely,” Neandross says. “Now the question is simply, how quickly can we ramp up the market penetration of these amazingly clean engines?”

Production of the ISL G NZ is expected to begin in April 2016, CWI says. It will be made available as a first-fit engine with transit and refuse OEMs, and as an engine replacement for existing ISL G vehicles, “resulting in an immediate NOx emission reduction well before the 2023 Near Zero NOx goals set in California.”

California Agency and Utility Support

CWI acknowledges engine development funding support from the South Coast Air Quality Management District , Southern California Gas, and the California Energy Commission.

“In Southern California, clean, zero- and near-zero emission vehicle technologies are critical to meeting clean air standards,” SCAQMD executive officer Barry Wallerstein says in the CWI announcement. “Cummins Westport’s new engine provides an important tool toward reaching that goal.”

“SoCalGas is pleased to be part of what began as collaborative research to advance our common goal to reduce emissions and improve air quality,” said SoCalGas president and CEO Dennis Arriola. “We congratulate CWI on developing this game-changing natural gas engine technology.”

‘A Testament to California’s Innovative Culture’

“Advancing clean energy technologies is a critical component of California’s strategy to address local air quality issues and climate change,” said California Energy Commission chair Robert Weisenmiller. “The development of this natural gas engine is a testament to California’s innovative culture, fostered by active collaboration and partnership.”

Performance and efficiency will match the current ISL G, with engine ratings from 250 to 320 horsepower, with 660 to 1,000 foor-pounds of torque available. Base warranty, extended coverage options, maintenance procedures and service intervals will be the same as the current ISL G.

The Near Zero technology is also to be applied to CWI’s new 6.7-liter ISB6.7 G and successful 11.9-liter ISX12 G engines.

Cummins Westport president Rob Neitzke unveiled the new engine at ACT Expo 2015 in Dallas on Tuesday evening.

Cummins Westport president Rob Neitzke unveiled 6.7-liter ISB6.7G at ACT Expo 2015 in Dallas this past spring (F&F, May 5), and said today that he expects to be able offer an NZ version too.


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Source: Cummins Westport with Fleets & Fuels follow-up

 

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