HHP Summit 2017

Lithium Balance

Lithium Balance for BMS – Battery Management

March 28, 2012 in Electric Drive, EVs, Hybrids by rich  |  No Comments

Denmark’s Lithium Balance promoted advanced battery management systems, including network BMS designs, at Electric Vehicles Land, Sea & Air USA 2012 in San Jose. As money pours into battery improvement, “battery management has to keep up,” the company says. It “is an essential enabling technology.”

Denmark's Lithium Balance promoted advanced battery management systems, including network BMS designs, at Electric Vehicles Land, Sea & Air USA 2012 in San Jose. A 48-volt integrated BMS unit is shown here.

Denmark’s Lithium Balance promoted advanced battery management systems, including network BMS designs, at Electric Vehicles Land, Sea & Air USA 2012 in San Jose. A 48-volt integrated BMS unit is shown here.

Battery management systems are vital because of the high levels of energy and power that are an inherent attribute of lithium batteries, said marketing manager Tunji Adebusuyi. “They are very dangerous things and they need to be properly managed,” he said.

Adebusuyi described his firm’s “n-BMS,” a networked system with what he called distributed intelligence, able to handle as many as 512 lithium cells wired in series, each individually managed. “It gives you a level of multiple redundancy,” he said – “if you lose a node, it’s unfortunate, but not fatal.”

Unlike other BMS suppliers, Lithium Balance focuses solely on battery management, Adebusuyi said in San Jose. Lithium Balance does not make motors, nor does it make electric vehicle controllers.

The firm aims to supply BMS technology that is “truly universal, usable by OEMs and aftermarket producers alike but at an affordable price point both in prototype quantities and volume.” Lithium Balance was founded in 2006 by the physicist Ivan Loncarevic.


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